Dialogue

Congratulations...it's that kind of day!

Sometimes, when it rains, it pours. And superstitious as I am, on Friday the 13th, it seems like a good idea to arise with considerable caution.

My days begin at dawn, around 5.30 every morning, give or take 30 minutes or so, with a summary of news feeds, email, then Twitter, followed by Facebook. In that order.

Björk Gudmunsdóttir and Scott Snibbe. “Virus,” Biophilia (2011), screenshot. Photo: via the Creator’s Project.

Björk Gudmunsdóttir and Scott Snibbe. “Virus,” Biophilia (2011), screenshot. Photo: via the Creator’s Project.

This morning's feed brought in a congratulatory nod to San Francisco resident, Scott Snibbe, for the MoMA's acquisition of his work, Biophilia, a collaboration with Björk, sold via the iPhone App Store. It's an amazing app, I can tell you, since I'm not just superstitious, but slightly inclined toward geeky tech art too - I bought a copy, and open it regularly (and during especially boring meetings). It has a beautiful soothing visual quality that reminds me how fortunate I am to live this life.

Some of my colleagues may remember Scott Snibbe, when he generously participated in a discussion panel honoring his early mentor, and the artist, Jim Campbell, at the SFMOMA's Bay Area Treasure Award in 2012. It was quite an evening.

The beauty of this news is that Scott Snibbe was introduced to me by Scott Kildall, his colleague and friend from university days at Brown, and also a San Francisco artist.

I am a big fan of Scott Kildall and his work, and am grateful for his acquaintance. His ideas about new media, digital work, the internet, and forward thinking, have kept him on my radar since we met. A self-described creator of "algorithms, sculptures, performances and videos, which repurpose networks of communication and production. His work frequently explores themes of future-thinking and translation between the virtual and the real."

I've shown his work in Basel, Miami, New York and San Francisco, attended his openings in London and at San Francisco collaborations, and look forward to his new work. With that in mind, it as a great pleasure to read about his collaboration with Bryan Cera, "3D-Print Your Own Readymade Copy of Marcel Duchamp’s Chess Set" in today's artnet news.

A 3D-printed replica of Marcel Duchamp’s chess set produced using Readymake: Duchamp Chess Set, a design created by Scott Kildall and Bryan Cera. Photo: Pete Prodoehl, via JS Online

A 3D-printed replica of Marcel Duchamp’s chess set produced using Readymake: Duchamp Chess Set, a design created by Scott Kildall and Bryan Cera. Photo: Pete Prodoehl, via JS Online

A direct relation to Kildall's 2010 work, Playing Duchamp, "Readymake" is a fabulous idea addressing appropriation. As the artists wrote in their statement, “The readymake brings the concept of the appropriated object to the realm of the internet, exploring the web’s potential to re-frame information and data, and their reciprocal relationships to matter and ideas.”

Robert Charles Dunahay. Hollywood. Oil on canvas.

Although the day is still young, I'll end this list of congratulatory nods with congratulations to Robert Charles Dunahay (the artist who showed his first exhibition at our first exhibition, a series of 10 large beautifully painted palm trees), for his latest sale. Robert wrote an email to me that said, "My dealer recently sold one of my palm paintings to Turki bin Abdullah al Saud, the 7th son of the King of Saudi Arabia. I love it when someone who can buy anything on the planet buys my work!"

Congratulations, obviously, to all!